First-Party Xbox Series X Exclusives Won’t be Available for a Couple of Years, Launch Titles Will Take Full Advantage of System

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Microsoft continues to discuss their future vision for Xbox as they confirm that all their games will be playable on old and newer versions of Xbox, stating that fans shouldn’t expect to see  Xbox Series X exclusives for the next two years.

Speaking with MCV in a recent interview, Head of Microsoft Studios, Matt Booty details what exactly they have in mind for Xbox, stating that the initial life-cycle of the Series X will contain cross-generation titles from their first-part studios.

“As our content comes out over the next year, two years, all of our games, sort of like PC, will play up and down that family of devices,” explains Booty, “We want to make sure that if someone invests in Xbox between now and [Series X] that they feel that they made a good investment and that we’re committed to them with content.”

Despite making titles available on current-gen Xbox One systems, Matt did state that fans can expect the Series X to be taken advantage of when it comes to all it has to offer, highlighting Halo Infinite as their big opportunity to show this.

“Our approach is to pick one or two IP that we’re going to focus on and make sure that they’re there at the launch of the console, taking advantage of all the features. And for us that’s going to be Halo Infinite, which is a big opportunity. It’s the first time in over 15 years that we’ll have a Halo title launching in sync with a new console. And that team is definitely going to be doing things to take advantage of [Series X].”

This approach is no surprise as Phil Spencer recently spoke about the Series X being the “best Xbox” they have ever created so far, saying that it’ll feature games written for generations before it, but offer far better improvements.

It’s an interesting approach, as while this may deter gamers from rushing out to buy the Series X, it does expand on the support of current-gen Xbox One for many more years to come.  Typically a start of a new generation marks the end of the current one as publishers slowly begin dropping support, though, with this more of a PC approach to how games are developed, this eliminates the idea that the new kills the old.

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